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Article
April 5, 1958

ELECTROCARDIOGRAM AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM IN ELECTIVE CARDIAC ARREST

Author Affiliations

Cleveland; U. S. Army

From the Department of Anesthesiology, Cleveland Clinic (Dr. Hale) and the Brooke Army Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Texas (Dr. Moraca).

JAMA. 1958;166(14):1672-1677. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990140006002
Abstract

The information afforded by continuous electrocardiographic and electroencephalographic monitoring is especially valuable during cardiac surgery. An abnormality seen in the electroencephalogram represents a summation of many influences affecting the brain and is not specific, but it tells when something is occurring that should be investigated. The promptness with which such changes follow a circulatory disturbance is illustrated by seven records made during operations in which the heart was arrested by injections of potassium citrate. The electrocardiogram showed the disorganization, cessation, and later resumption of cardiac activity; the electroencephalogram reflected the level of anesthesia, the effect of temperature changes, the state of the cerebral circulation, and the adequacy of respiration. These means help to maintain the necessary close rapport between the anesthetist and the essential physiological functions of the patient.

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