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Article
April 5, 1958

OBSERVATIONS ON SURVIVAL OF PATIENTS TREATED FOR UTERINE CANCER: THIRTY-FOUR YEAR PERIOD (1921-1955)

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

Professor emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jefferson Medical College.

JAMA. 1958;166(14):1694-1697. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990140028005
Abstract

Survival is not a synonym for comfort, and the statistics for five-year survivals after treatment for cancer cannot reflect the vicissitudes of the individual patient. A series of 487 cancer patients treated from 1921 through 1947 included a group of 127 with cancer of the cervix, and 77 (60%) of this group are living from 10 to 29 years since the time of treatment. A number of histories are given, particularly that of a woman who died of apoplexy at the age of 86, 32 years after her first treatment with radium for cancer of the cervix. There were long-term survivors irrespective of the techniques of treatment. Similar experiences are recorded for cancer of the corpus uteri, and the histories given include that of a woman living at the age of 87, 32 years after surgery. Granulosa cell tumor of an ovary developed in two patients, 10 years after radium therapy for cervical cancers. Examples of long survival occurred regardless of the grade of malignancy of the tumor or whether treatment had been by radium, surgery, or the two combined.

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