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Article
April 26, 1958

PRINCIPLES FOR PRECAUTIONARY LABELING OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Secretary, Committee on Toxicology, American Medical Association.

JAMA. 1958;166(17):2154-2157. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990170052012
Abstract

A substantial number of packaged chemicals are not now required by law to identify hazardous ingredients on their labels or to warn users of the dangers of overuse or misuse. The need for precautionary labeling of chemical products was first formally registered by the American Medical Association in 1884 with the adoption of a resolution urging that Congress and the several state legislatures be called on to enact legislation to require lye to be sold as a poison and under a poison label. A broad and encompassing act requiring precautionary labeling of hazardous substances in commercial, household, and industrial chemicals has now been drafted by the American Medical Association's Committee on Toxicology. The bill is intended as a model for uniform laws to require the declaration of hazardous ingredients and warning statements on the label and in the accompanying literature of chemical products.

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