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Article
May 24, 1958

PLEUROESOPHAGEAL LINE IN NORMAL CHEST ROENTGENOGRAMS

Author Affiliations

Dallas, Texas

Chief, Radiation Therapy, Veteran's Administration Hospital, and Clinical Assistant Professor of Radiology, Southwestern Medical School of the University of Texas.

JAMA. 1958;167(4):437-441. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990210023005
Abstract

The pleuroesophageal line, formerly called the esophageal-pleural stripe, can be seen in about one-fourth of all routine roentgenograms of the adult chest. It is usually 3-5 mm. wide, curving downward and to the left from the apex of the right lung toward the arch of the aorta, but it exhibits many variations. Evidence here presented shows that it is the shadow of a soft tissue plane that separates the right lung from certain other air-filled structures in the mediastinum. It has no pathological or prognostic significance, but its normal variations should be studied and appreciated if false associations of the pleuroesophageal line with symptoms or suspected disease processes are to be avoided.

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