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Article
June 14, 1958

REGIONAL BLOCK AT THE WRIST OF THE GREAT NERVES OF THE HAND

Author Affiliations

Salt Lake City

Consultant in surgery of the hand, Utah Crippled Children's Service, Clinical Instructor in Surgery, University of Utah College of Medicine, and Attending Surgeon, St. Mark's Hospital.

JAMA. 1958;167(7):847-850. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.72990240009008c
Abstract

"Local anesthesia" is a term often mistakenly used to include all methods of anesthetization not included under general, topical, or spinal. There are two still-popular traditional techniques by which local anesthetics are administered: 1. The rapid insertion of the needle followed by a swift injection of all the solution that the tissues can take (fig. 1, A). This is used for the performance of elective procedures on the body. Quite often, one seeks for paresthesias in the nerves prior to injection. 2. The second popular method, based on equally fallacious reasoning, is used for the repair of open wounds. After the patient has suffered cleansing of the wound with tincture of green soap or one of the modern germicidal soaps (both of which cause pain), the wound is infiltrated by multiple insertions of the needle both in the proximal and distal wound edges (fig. 1, B).

There are several fallacies

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