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Article
June 21, 1958

CARDIAC ACTIVITY IN AN APNEIC FIVE HUNDRED EIGHTY GRAM HUMAN FETUS: MAINTAINED FOR TWENTY-ONE HOURS AT TEMPERATURES BETWEEN 22 C AND 0.1 C

Author Affiliations

Stockholm

From the Wenner-Gren Cardiovascular Research Laboratory. Dr. Miller is a Senior Postdoctoral Fellow, National Science Foundation, from the Department of Anatomy, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, Ga. Dr. Marini is a Swedish Government Fellow from the Department of Pediatrics, University of Ferrara, Italy.

JAMA. 1958;167(8):976-982. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.72990250001009
Abstract

Nine years ago, the rationale for the use of hypothermia in asphyxial conditions was discussed and preliminary data were presented which showed that cooled animals tolerate longer exposures to asphyxia than do animals at normal body temperatures.1 Subsequently, these results were confirmed and extended by experiments on several hundred neonatal and adult guinea pigs.2 Even more striking benefits in asphyxia have been reported for hypothermia in the case of neonatal rabbits and puppies, which are less mature at birth than the guinea pig.2b In all species investigated, the newborn member is more tolerant of hypothermia than the adult of the same species. In addition, tolerance is greater in those species which are less mature at birth than in those which are more mature. Accordingly, it has been suggested that, in all probability, the full-term human infant can tolerate lower temperatures than the adult and that the premature

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