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Article
June 21, 1958

ACUTE BLOOD LOSS REQUIRING FIFTY-EIGHT TRANSFUSIONS: USE OF ANTIGRAVITY SUIT AS AID IN POSTPARTUM INTRA-ABDOMINAL HEMORRHAGE

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

From The Cleveland Clinic Foundation and The Frank E. Bunts Educational Institute.

JAMA. 1958;167(8):985-986. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.72990250010009b
Abstract

In this case of placenta percreta (a placenta that has grown through the uterine wall because of failure of development of decidua basalis), control of bleeding was finally accomplished after a desperate struggle in which the application of pneumatic pressure to the lower half of the body appeared to mark the turning point.

The modified antigravity suit (commonly referred to as the "G-suit") used in this case was developed primarily for the purpose of preventing postural hypotension during neurosurgical operations with the patient in the sitting position.1 It consists of a large plastic inflatable bladder that is wrapped about the lower half of the body after the manner of a huge blood pressure cuff. This principle was first employed in 1903 by Crile2 for the prevention and treatment of hemorrhagic shock in surgery of the head and neck. As blood transfusions became relatively safe it was abandoned, to

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