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Article
June 21, 1958

PERIVENTRICULAR CALCIFICATION AND CYTOMEGALIC INCLUSION DISEASE IN NEWBORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

Miami, Fla.

From the departments of radiology, pediatrics, and pathology of the University of Miami School of Medicine, and the sections of radiology, pediatrics, and pathology of Jackson Memorial Hospital.

JAMA. 1958;167(8):989-991. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.72990250014009d
Abstract

The purpose of this case report is to call attention to the unusual findings on the skull roentgenograms of a newborn infant. The films disclosed calcium lining the walls of the lateral ventricles of the brain. Such a picture has been reported four times previously,1 all in infants with generalized cytomegalic inclusion disease. Our patient showed the characteristic cells of cytomegalic inclusion disease in the urine. We are presenting this case to suggest that this radiographic finding, when present, indicates a diagnosis of cytomegalic inclusion disease and may be pathognomonic of the disease.

Report of a Case 

History.—  An infant (fig.1) was born July 17, 1957, after a 40-week gestation. He weighed 2,154 Gm. (4.7 lb.) and therefore was transferred to the premature nursery at the Jackson Memorial Hospital for care. He was the first child of a 20-year-old primipara whose blood was group A and Rh positive

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