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Article
September 13, 1958

EFFECT OF COMPETITIVE INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY ON SEVERELY DISABLED CARDIAC PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Albertson, N. Y.

From the Human Resources Corporation, a division of Abilities, Inc.

JAMA. 1958;168(2):147-153. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.03000020009002
Abstract

Employers are reluctant to hire persons with cardiac disease even if they do not have a definite policy against it. Reasons for the reluctance in hiring these persons are reported to be that the physical demand of work exceeded the physical capacity of the cardiac patient; there is risk of monetary loss arising out of compensation claims; it is considered that cardiac patients are a heavy burden on company-sponsored insurance programs; there is insufficient medical staff; and it is not in accordance with the policy of the personnel department. Frequently, the detrimental effect of the psychological and emotional stress of a patient after ill-advised activity restriction is actually greater than that due to the cardiac involvement per se. The elimination of fear about heart disease is thought to be the major problem faced by the general practitioner in his efforts to rehabilitate patients with cardiovascular disease.

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