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Article
September 13, 1958

TROCHANTERIC SYNDROME: CALCAREOUS AND NONCALCAREOUS TENDONITIS AND BURSITIS ABOUT THE TROCHANTER MAJOR

Author Affiliations

El Paso, Texas

From the El Paso Orthopaedic Surgery Group.

JAMA. 1958;168(2):175-177. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.63000020003007a
Abstract

The trochanteric syndrome frequently masquerades as sciatica. Tenderness and pain in the region of the trochanter major, often with irradiation of this pain down the posterolateral aspect of the thigh, constitute a well-defined syndrome. This symptom pattern is analogous to the so-called bursitis of the shoulder. The locus of pathology is in the abductor mechanism of the hip. The cause of the primary form is wear and tear, that of the secondary form the presence of foreign material, such as the end of a hip nail. Roentgenograms often reveal calcification in the tendons inserting into the trochanter. The condition is not rare. Local injection of hydrocortisone relieves the symptoms of the primary type.

Tendonitis, tenosynovitis, and bursitis about the glenohumeral joint are well known to the profession. These conditions are recognized and lumped together by the laity as bursitis of the shoulder. The analogous conditions in the region of the

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