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Article
November 29, 1958

INTOXICATION FROM PRIMIDONE DUE TO ITS BIOTRANSFORMATION TO PHENOBARBITAL

Author Affiliations

San Francisco

From the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of California School of Medicine. Drs. Plaa and Fujimoto are now at the Department of Pharmacology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans.

JAMA. 1958;168(13):1769-1770. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.63000130003008a
Abstract

Primidone (Mysoline), 5-phenyl-5-ethylhexahydropyrimidine-4,6-dione, is an anticonvulsive agent which has been used successfully in the treatment of grand mal epilepsy and is reported to have controlled seizures in cases refractive to other anticonvulsant therapy. It is not an official drug, but was included in New and Nonofficial Remedies of 1957. It is marketed in oral tablets of 0.25 Gm.; the daily dose for adults is 0.5 to 1.5 Gm. It is a congener of phenobarbital, in that the oxygen on the second carbon has been reduced with hydrogen. In this respect it is similar to 2-dihydro 5,5-diphenylhydantoin, the congener of diphenylhydantoin, which was shown to be an effective anticonvulsant by Hine.1

Side-effects have been reported2 to be more frequent than with phenobarbital and include the usual signs and symptoms of anticonvulsant drug toxicity, including dizziness, nausea, vomiting, ataxia, mood change, and pruritic rash. Toxic side-effects are stated to be

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