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Article
January 17, 1959

ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT-RESULTS OF SURGICAL CORRECTION IN ONE HUNDRED PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Denver

From the departments of medicine and surgery, University of Colorado Medical Center. Dr. Davies is now registrar at Heart Hospital, London.

JAMA. 1959;169(3):210-213. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000200008002
Abstract

One hundred consecutive patients, ranging in age from 10 months to 45 years, with a diagnosis of atrial septal defect secundum, were operated on. Of the 100 patients, 38 were asymptomatic, 29 mildly incapacitated, 23 moderately incapacitated, and 10 severely so. Only eight gave a history indicative of congestive cardiac failure. The most prominent complaints were shortness of breath, fatigue, and palpitations (pounding in the chest). Operation was performed under conditions of hypothermia and inflow-outflow occlusion. After the second year of life, the earlier the operation is performed the better. Surgery in a relatively asymptomatic child between the ages of 2 and 10 years carries a minimum of risk and in all probability will insure a normal cardiovascular system when maturity is reached. A high pulmonary vascular resistance increases the risk and decreases the gain that can be anticipated from operation.

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