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Article
January 31, 1959

LATE SEQUELAE OF SADDLE BLOCK ANESTHESIA IN OBSTETRICS

Author Affiliations

Little Rock, Ark.

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Drs. Dodge and Brown), and the Department of Neurology (Dr. Jordan), University of Arkansas School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1959;169(5):429-432. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000220009003
Abstract

Evidence of neurological damage attributable to saddle block anesthesia was sought in the records of 3,147 obstetric patients who received this type of anesthesia in 1946-1951. Careful long-term follow-up was possible in 1,077 patients. Only six of these had findings that might be related to the anesthesia. These findings were usually altered reflexes, sensory changes in the legs, headaches, and dizziness. No major sequelae were found. In this series of patients the slight disadvantages of saddle block anesthesia were far outweighed by its advantages, especially its effectiveness, safety, and acceptance by patients and physicians.

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