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Article
January 31, 1959

CRITIQUE OF SOME STATISTICS ON HEALTH INSURANCE AMONG THE AGED

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Research Associate, Bureau of Medical Economic Research, American Medical Association.

JAMA. 1959;169(5):507-509. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73000220027019
Abstract

National surveys of households now show a growing number of persons 65 years of age and over who own voluntary health insurance. By themselves, these figures on the total aged population understate the true extent of this coverage, since sizable groups among the aged do not wish to purchase this type of voluntary insurance. An analysis of these groups who have other alternatives will clarify the meaning of existing statistics on the extent of voluntary health insurance coverage of the entire aged population.

All are aware that the aged have heterogeneous attitudes toward working, housing, religion, leisure, and eating. There is little reason to believe that they maintain a homogeneous attitude toward the purchase of voluntary health insurance. Since some individuals during working life do not wish to purchase any insurance even though physically eligible and financially able, it is not surprising that there are also groups among the elderly

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