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Article
February 7, 1959

ASSOCIATION OF HEMADSORPTION VIRUSES WITH RESPIRATORY ILLNESS IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.; Bethesda, Md.; Washington, D. C.

From the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (Drs. Chanock, Cook, Kapikian, and Reichelderfer), and the Virus Section, Research Foundation, Children's Hospital of the District of Columbia (Drs. Chanock, Vargosko, and Parrott and Miss Luckey).

JAMA. 1959;169(6):548-553. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000230004002
Abstract

Hemadsorption, a specific phenomenon dependent on the hemagglutinating property of the virus, was observed in two viruses newly recovered from children with acute respiratory disease. In a study involving 1,738 children in three hospitals, one or the other of the two hemadsorption viruses was recovered from 54 (6%) of 859 patients with respiratory disease. It appeared that the two viruses were capable of causing a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including croup, pneumonia, bronchiolitis, pharyngitis, and mild afebrile disease. Serologic studies suggested that approximately 20% of the respiratory illness severe enough to require hospitalization in the Washington, D. C., area in 1957-1958 was associated with hemadsorption virus infection.

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