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Article
February 7, 1959

NEONATAL INFECTIONS IN A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL: REPORT OF TWO OUTBREAKS

Author Affiliations

Baton Rouge, La.; New Orleans; Baton Rouge, La.

From the Department of Pediatrics, Tulane University School of Medicine (Dr. Van Gelder), the Epidemic Intelligence Service, U. S. Public Health Service, at Tulane University School of Medicine (Dr. Carey), and the Department of Pathology, Baton Rouge General Hospital (Drs. Colvin and Randall).

JAMA. 1959;169(6):559-566. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000230015004
Abstract

Two outbreaks of neonatal infection in a nursery are described. The first involved 4 children and was fatal to 3; the second, a year later, involved 26 children and was fatal to 9. No one organism could be held responsible, but in the first outbreak Listeria monocytogenes predominated, and in the second the organisms found were mainly group A streptococci. The experience emphasized the danger of overcrowding in nurseries, the importance of due attention to the umbilicus as a likely portal of entry for neonatal infections, and the need generally of enforcing rigid aseptic techniques.

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