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Article
March 7, 1959

SCREENING FOR DIABETES BY THE GLUCOSE OXIDASE METHOD

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Attending Physician, Grant Hospital and Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine (Dr. Chertack), and Pathologist, Grant Hospital of Chicago, and Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine (Dr. Sherrick).

JAMA. 1959;169(10):1059-1061. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73000270001010
Abstract

Recently there has been increasing interest in screening programs for diabetes, and several different screening methods have been advocated.1 The results of screening programs differ considerably, depending on the age, weight, and family history of the group screened; on the type, technique, and standards of screening; on the extent of diagnostic evaluation; and on the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus used in the program.1a

Although there is disagreement as to the choice of a screening procedure, certain general principles are acceptable to most authorities.1e It is generally recognized that, while the glucose tolerance test would be the ideal procedure, it is too expensive and too complicated for most large-scale programs. The combination of a urine sugar test and a post-prandial blood sugar test is considered to be one of the most effective methods, but this has a limited application because of the necessity of obtaining a blood specimen.

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