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Article
March 14, 1959

ILEAL INTUSSUSCEPTION AS RESULT OF INTESTINAL INTUBATION

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Radiology of the New York University—Bellevue Medical Center.

JAMA. 1959;169(11):1189-1190. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73000280003010a
Abstract

The long intestinal tube commonly employed in a wide variety of conditions has been in use for about 20 years. The single lumen tube was introduced in 1944, at which time mercury began to replace air in the tube's bag.1 The complications of intubation have been discussed by many authors. The particular one reported in this paper is rare. Smith,2 reporting on 1,000 intubations, failed to observe a single case of intussusception. Nichols,1 using the Harris tube, had one case. Dunn and Shearburn3 quote three cases from the literature and add one case of their own. Wangensteen4 and Cantor and Reynolds5 mention the long intestinal tube as a rare cause of intussusception.

Recently such a complication occurred in one of our patients. We are reporting this case because it clearly visualizes the cause and effect and, to our knowledge, possesses the best illustrations of

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