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Article
March 21, 1959

ASSOCIATION OF SPECIFIC OVERT BEHAVIOR PATTERN WITH BLOOD AND CARDIOVASCULAR FINDINGS: BLOOD CHOLESTEROL LEVEL, BLOOD CLOTTING TIME, INCIDENCE OF ARCUS SENILIS, AND CLINICAL CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

JAMA. 1959;169(12):1286-1296. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000290012005
Abstract

Three groups of men, selected solely according to the behavior pattern which they habitually manifested in their work, were compared with respect to their serum cholesterol levels, clotting times, presence of clinical coronary disease, and presence of arcus senilis. A group (A) of 83 men were chosen as manifesting an intense, sustained drive for achievement and as being continually involved in competition and deadlines, both at work and in their avocations. In this group the serum cholesterol level, the frequency of arcus senilis, and the incidence of coronary artery disease were much higher than in a group (B) of 83 men who manifested the opposite sort of behavior pattern and a group (C) of 46 unemployed blind men selected as manifesting a chronic state of insecurity and anxiety. Clinical coronary artery disease was seven times more frequent in group A than in group B or group C. Analysis of factors other than the overt behavior pattern described indicated that this pattern per se was largely responsible for the striking differences found.

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