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Article
March 21, 1959

FEVER OF OBSCURE ORIGIN-THE VALUE OF ABDOMINAL EXPLORATION IN DIAGNOSIS: REPORT OF SEVENTY CASES

Author Affiliations

Rochester, Minn.

From the sections of medicine (Drs. Geraci and Nichols) and bacteriology (Dr. Weed), Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation. The Mayo Foundation is a part of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota.

JAMA. 1959;169(12):1306-1315. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000290032008
Abstract

A study of the diagnostic value of laparotomy was made in 70 patients with febrile states that had lasted longer than two weeks and had been explained by repeated thorough physical and laboratory examinations. In 21 patients exploration of the abdominal cavity revealed malignant disease, and in 10 of these the lesion was a lymphoblastoma. In 15 patients evidence of specific infections was found, and in 5 of these it was tuberculous peritonitis. The surgical intervention entailed little risk. Its dagnostic value in cases of fever of obscure origin was evident.

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