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Article
April 4, 1959

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYC HOPHYSIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS: FOLLOW-UP STUDY

Author Affiliations

Denver

From the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1959;169(14):1581-1587. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000310033008
Abstract

A continued and more intensive investigation of the personal factors that might make some drivers more susceptible than others to automobile accidents was carried out in 20 airmen. Ten had been held officially responsible for two or more accidents in the preceding four and one-half years. They were compared with 10 who had no record of accidents in the same period. The tests included a structured psychiatric interview and a routine psychological examination as well as other functional tests. No differences were found between the two groups in either intelligence or psychophysiological responsivity. However, in the area of personality functioning, accident-repeaters displayed significantly poorer control of hostility, lower tension-tolerance, higher separation anxiety and dependency needs, and extremes both of egocentricity or sociocentricity and fantasy-preoccupation or unreflectiveness.

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