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Article
April 11, 1959

SAFFLOWER OIL-PYRIDOXINE AND CORN OIL-PYRIDOXINE EMULSIONS: THEIR EFFECT ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL LEVELS IN YOUNG ADULT MALES WHEN USED AS SUPPLEMENTS TO A NORMAL DIET

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Vascular Section, Department of Medicine, New York Hospital-Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1959;169(15):1731-1734. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000320033008
Abstract

The effects of using safflower oil and corn oil as supplements to the usual diet were studied in 22 young healthy men. Serum was obtained weekly from each subject by venipuncture, to be analyzed for total cholesterol. Determinations during an initial observation period of five weeks afforded a basis for dividing the subjects into two matched groups with equal mean serum cholesterol levels (221 mg. per 100 cc.). One group thereupon received a supplement of safflower oil for seven weeks followed by corn oil for seven weeks; the other group received corn oil for seven weeks followed by safflower oil for seven weeks. In both groups a consistent decline in the mean cholesterol levels was observed as the experiment progressed, but the changes were not convincing because of the wide individual variations and no differences between safflower and corn oil were revealed under the conditions of this experiment. Significant cholesterol-lowering effect of these two oils can be demonstrated only if they are used as replacements for, rather than additions to, some of the saturated fats in the usual diet.

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