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Article
April 25, 1959

TELEVISION IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY AND OTHER SPECIALITIES—A NEW TEACHING DEVICE

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Laryngeal Research Laboratory, William and Harriet Gould Foundation, and Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1959;169(17):1976-1980. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000340008002

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Abstract

Clinical teaching is difficult when conditions do not permit more than one person at a time to see the part of the body that is being examined or treated. The equipment here described is designed to overcome this difficulty. It is mounted on the instructor's head in such a way as to permit him to observe the interior of an organ directly while a properly aligned and focused television camera picks up an image that can be transmitted to an audience of any desired size. The critical elements of the apparatus are a small, lightweight television camera and a periscopic system with front-surfaced mirror, peep-sight, lens, and prism. The helmet bearing the apparatus is heavy and must be counterpoised. External sources of intense illumination are available. This form of closed-circuit television is useful in clinics, classrooms, operating rooms, and situations arising in postgraduate instruction.

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