[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 25, 1959

FAVORABLE RESPONSE IN THE CLINICAL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC ALCOHOLISM

Author Affiliations

Baltimore

Chief of the Division of Mental Health, Maryland State Department of Health (Dr. Thomas); Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University (Dr. Gliedman); Public Health Nursing Consultant, Maryland State Department of Health (Miss Freund); Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology, Johns Hopkins University (Dr. Imber); and Instructor in Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University (Mr. Stone).

JAMA. 1959;169(17):1994-1997. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000340026007
Abstract

The records of 57 men and 20 women patients in six county rehabilitation clinics for alcoholics were studied in order to identify the factors favoring recovery. Treatment included both individual and group psychotherapy. Criteria of improvement included the amount or frequency of alcoholconsumption, family and social adjustment, occupational adjustment, and physical appearance, and 42% of the patients improved on three or more of these criteria. The greatest improvement was found in those who attended the most treatment-sessions, whose spouses participated in the sessions, and whose relatives received routine social service contacts. The people attracted to these clinics were of a socially stable type in extreme contrast to the alcoholic stereotype. The unusually favorable results obtained demonstrate the importance of considering groups, especially the family, in future planning for the outpatient treatment of chronic alcoholism.

×