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Article
April 25, 1959

AGED INFIRM RESIDENTS IN A CUSTODIAL INSTITUTION: TWO-YEAR MEDICAL AND SOCIAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

Mount Vernon, N. Y.; Valhalla, N. Y.; M.P.H.; New York

From the departments of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N. Y., New York University—Bellevue Medical Center, New York, and Westchester County Home and Westchester County Department of Public Welfare, White Plains, N. Y. Dr. Kearley is now in Sydney, Australia.

JAMA. 1959;169(17):2009-2012. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03000340041011
Abstract

The feasibility of a method of disability evaluation in aged infirm people was tested in a group of 115 residents of a custodial institution. They were observed over a period of two years, at the end of which time about half of those remaining in the institution were over 75 years of age. A continuous process of rehabilitation was shown to be necessary in these patients. It involves restoration, reactivation, and maintenance and is especially important in those who have been admitted from a hospital or are temporarily hospitalized during their residency. There is a tendency for them to continue at the low level at which they were functioning when discharged from the hospital. This is a major problem in a domiciliary institution. Its solution requires the cooperation of the family and the community. Periodic disability evaluation and assessment of the patient's resources are essential. During the period of the study seven residents were discharged from the county home to their community.

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