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Article
May 2, 1959

PERSISTENCE OF ANTIBODIES AFTER VACCINATION WITH LIVING ATTENUATED POLIOVIRUS

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia; Thiells, N. Y.; Philadelphia

From the Wistar Institute (Drs. Plotkin and Koprowski and Mr. Norton), the Department of Laboratories of Letchworth Village (Dr. Jervis), and the Philadelphia Children's Hospital (Dr. Stokes). Dr. Plotkin is Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer of the Communicable Disease Center, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Ga., on assignment to the Wistar Institute.

JAMA. 1959;170(1):8-12. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010010010002
Abstract

The duration of immunity produced by oral administration of living attenuated poliovirus has been investigated in three groups of children so treated since 1950. After the administration there was no apparent illness in any of the 26 subjects, but all developed antibodies and the virus was generally demonstrated in the feces. Tests for neutralizing antibodies showed that neither the young age of some of the infants nor their possession of transplacental antibodies had any discernible effect on antibody levels after vaccination and that the seven children in group A (who received the rodent adapted TN type 2 virus) all had type 2 antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256 approximately eight years after the vaccination. Vaccination with living attenuated poliovirus should theoretically induce lifelong immunity similar to that induced by the natural infection.

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