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Article
May 9, 1959

NEW OPHTHALMIC DECONGESTANT, TETRAHYDROZOLINE HYDROCHLORIDECLINICAL USE IN 1,156 PATIENTS WITH CONJUNCTIVAL IRRITATION

JAMA. 1959;170(2):178-179. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010020036011
Abstract

Tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride is a sympathomimetic agent which causes local vasoconstriction when topically applied and a rise of blood pressure when given systemically. Instilled as a 0.05% solution into the eye, it was found to afford prompt relief, lasting from one to four hours, from the congestion accompanying allergic or chronic conjunctivitis. It was administered in doses of a single drop instilled into each eye two to four times daily in 1,156 patients with these conditions. This dose, while sufficient to give the desired relief in the majority of patients, had no side-effects beyond a mild, transient irritation. It did not raise the intraocular pressure and had no adverse effects when used for periods up to two years in patients with cataracts. There was no evidence that it affected the course of cataract or hindered recovery from chronic conjunctivitis or from the subacute stage of acute conjunctivitis.

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