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Article
May 16, 1959

MAINTENANCE OF STANDARDS IN GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Director, Division of Scientific Activities, American Medical Association.

JAMA. 1959;170(3):310-313. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010030054014
Abstract

Shortly before the middle of the 19th century, leaders in medicine evidenced increasing concern over the low standards of medical education and practice in the United States. During meetings of the New York State Medical Society1 in 1844 and 1845, several resolutions dealing with medical education and licensure were introduced. Lively discussions followed; it was obvious that something should be done, but it was equally apparent that it would be impractical for one state alone to try to raise standards. It was subsequently suggested that this obstacle to improving standards might be obviated at a national medical convention, where the delegates from medical societies, medical colleges, and institutions of the several states might be persuaded to act in cooperation on this important matter. Therefore, the following resolution was introduced:

Whereas, it is believed that a National Convention would be conducive to the elevation of the standard of medical education

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