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Article
May 16, 1959

WORKSHOP CONFERENCE ON SPECIALISM IN MEDICINE: 3. THE RESIDENT AND FELLOW

Author Affiliations

Baltimore; New York

Professor of Medicine and Director of the Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Dr. Harvey), and Professor of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College (Dr. Reader).

JAMA. 1959;170(3):317-318. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010030061017
Abstract

The workshop was opened with an outline of the magnitude of the problem posed by the training of residents and fellows. The figures given by Dr. Ernest L. Stebbins were cited: 31,000 physicians studying in 5,000 programs in 1,200 different institutions. This is a far larger area of educational endeavor in medicine than the medical schools themselves provide. With the growth in population and research training predicted by the Bayne-Jones report, it may be expected that by 1970 a billion dollars a year will go into medical education and research. Since less than a third of that amount is now being spent, the rate of growth in the next decade will be logarithmic. It is going to take a great deal of intelligent thought to plan the new training programs and to deal with the competition that will inevitably occur among them.

Various members of the panel were then called

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