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Article
June 13, 1959

STEROID THERAPY IN SEVERE BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Dobbs Ferry, N. Y.; New York

Attending Physician, Veterans Administration Hospital, Bronx, N. Y., and Research Assistant in Hematology, the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City (Dr. Lustgarten); Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, New York University—Bellevue Medical Center College of Medicine, and Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital (Dr. Vogl).

JAMA. 1959;170(7):800-805. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.63010070002010a
Abstract

Experience has shown that, despite vigorous antibiotic therapy, 30% of the patients with bacterial endocarditis die from the initial infection and another 42% either die later or are left with increased disability as a result of the damage superimposed on the underlying heart disease by the infection.1 The need for early diagnosis and prompt institution of potent therapy has, therefore, been stressed.

Fever of undetermined origin for more than a week in a person with an apparently organic heart murmur has become widely accepted as sufficient criterion for the clinical diagnosis of bacterial endocarditis and as an indication for starting therapy, without waiting for other more decisive clinical or laboratory evidence.1 Various antibiotic regimens have been proposed for their superiority in bacteriologically obscure and resistant cases. However, no significant improvement in the above statistics has occurred since 1948, and the need for new methods of management is evident. The

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