[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 27, 1959

CARDIAC ARREST OCCURRING OUTSIDE THE OPERATING ROOM: DEMONSTRATION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF A TRAINED RESUSCITATION TEAM

Author Affiliations

Newark, N. J.

From the Newark Beth Israel Hospital. Dr. Evers is now at the Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1959;170(9):1053-1055. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.63010090004010b
Abstract

Successful resuscitation of patients who develop cardiac arrest in the operating room has become almost commonplace in current medical practice. Many hospitals train their operating room personnel in the necessary emergency principles and techniques of treating this complication. Theoretically it is possible to resuscitate patients who develop cardiac arrest outside the operating room if the proper conditions prevail. Since the cerebral cortex can withstand only three to four minutes of anoxia before irreversible damage occurs, the primary condition for successful treatment must be that personnel and equipment should be at hand at the time of the emergency.

The Newark (N. J.) Beth Israel Hospital cardiac arrest team has been organized to assure that immediate therapy can be instituted anywhere within the hospital. This has been accomplished by training programs, the establishment of a house staff resuscitation team, and the judicious placement of emergency equipment.1 Partly as a result of

×