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July 18, 1959

NEW ANTIBODY (ANTI-RhB) RESULTING FROM BLOOD TRANSFUSION IN AN Rh-POSITIVE PATIENT

Author Affiliations

New York

Director, Blood and Plasma Bank, New York University—Bellevue Medical Center (Dr. Unger); Senior Bacteriologist (Serology), Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, New York City, and Attending Immunohematologist, Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, N. Y. (Dr. Wiener); and Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Hematology), New York University—Bellevue Medical Center (Dr. Weiner).

JAMA. 1959;170(12):1380-1383. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010120016005
Abstract

A woman, aged 57, received four blood transfusions at various times during a period of three months before, during, and after surgery. Before each transfusion the prospective donor's blood was shown to be compatible by an unusually elaborate series of tests; yet the first two transfusions were followed by chills and fever, presumably because of some unrecognizable incompatibility. The results led the authors to the conclusion that in Rh-positive blood, associated with the Rho factor, there are other blood factors which they designate RhA, RhB, RhC, etc. The complications in this case could be explained when it became possible to demonstrate in the patient's serum the presence of a new antibody, which they designate as anti-RhB.

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