[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 8, 1959

AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND RECORDING OF CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital; currently Clinical Associate, National Heart Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

JAMA. 1959;170(15):1782-1785. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010150026007
Abstract

The cardiac monitor here described is a portable instrument used in connection with a standard electrocardiograph. From this source the monitor receives impulses which are amplified and interpreted, actuate the recording mechanism, cause an alarm to sound, and can, optionally, start up an electrical cardiac stimulator. Five cases illustrate its operation in patients with episodes of ventricular asystole, asymptomatic changes in intraventricular conduction, a paroxysm of bigeminal rhythm, an episode of extreme nodal bradycardia, and bouts of asymptomatic paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. In a sixth patient the instrument recorded a sudden change from a sinus rhythm at 65 to a nodal rhythm at 80 beats per minute. This sort of continuous monitoring has evident advantages over intermittent observation.

×