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Article
August 29, 1959

BLEEDING DUODENAL ULCER: STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO PATIENTS, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO PAIN, SEASONAL INCIDENCE, AND BLOOD GROUPS

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, U. S. Naval Hospital.

JAMA. 1959;170(18):2174-2177. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010180026009
Abstract

Data relating the course of abdominal pain to the severity of bleeding from duodenal ulcers were obtained from 162 patients, in each of whom the diagnosis had been established by contrast roentgenography, operation, or autopsy. Among 45 patients with minimal bleeding, 4 experienced some relief of pain, while among 26 patients with moderate to severe bleeding, 7 experienced some relief of pain. Thus, relief from pain occurred more frequently in association with the more severe episodes of bleeding. In this group of patients the more severe hemorrhages were also associated with advancing age, with the fall and winter months of the year, and with a slightly increased frequency of blood group O. These facts suggest that in seeking the cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage, greater stress should be placed on the pain pattern.

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