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Article
September 12, 1959

MANAGEMENT OF SOFT-TISSUE TRAUMA AFTER A NUCLEAR STRIKE

Author Affiliations

U. S. Army

Director, Division of Surgery, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D. C.

JAMA. 1959;171(2):209-212. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73010200032014i
Abstract

The problem of soft-tissue injury and treatment after the detonation of a nuclear weapon is complicated by several factors: the number of casualties, the types of wounds, and the effect of wholebody ionizing radiation on wound treatment and wound healing.

Before we can plan any effort we would be in a more advantageous position if we had some idea of the numbers of casualties who will be present for treatment. This is an important definition: the numbers of casualties who will be present for treatment. We all recognize that after a nuclear strike against our military or civilian populace we are going to be faced with a tremendous number of casualties. But how many of these are going to be present for treatment? Moreover, it is probable that only a fraction of this number will have soft-tissue injuries that will require early definitive surgical treatment in the classic sense. To

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