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Article
October 24, 1959

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF STAPHYLOCOCCIC INFECTION IN NURSERY OF SMALL COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

Author Affiliations

Rockville Centre, N. Y.

From the South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, N. Y.

JAMA. 1959;171(8):1080-1085. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010260036007
Abstract

It is easier to prevent a nursery outbreak of staphylococcic infection than to bring under control a full-blown epidemic. A 10-part program aimed at controlling an epidemic is detailed, the main points being isolation of all infected infants and those with positive cultures, administration of an antibiotic to all newborn infants, and temporarily excusing from duty all nursing personnel harboring staphylococci in the nasopharynx. Staphylococcic infection is frequently endemic in the community among neonatal infants and postpartum women before it becomes epidemic in a nursery. Cases developing at home are greater in number and clinically more severe than the nursery cases. Information about community dissemination may be obtained by a questionnaire sent to the mother when an infant is 2 months old.

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