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Article
November 7, 1959

MEDICINE IN THE TEACHING HOSPITAL OF TODAY AND TOMORROW

Author Affiliations

Boston

Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Chief of the Medical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital.

JAMA. 1959;171(10):1277-1281. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010280001001
Abstract

Good medical care must still depend on the dedicated and well-trained physician. The integration of medicine depends on the integration of medical teachers. The educational experiment here described involved the creation of integrated units within a teaching hospital, each unit being a miniature department of medicine made up of full-time and part-time physicians, clinical investigators, and, in some instances, basic scientists. The units are devoted to such fields as hematology, gastroenterology, and cardiology, and the arrangement is not to be confused with the division of a hospital into arthritis wards, gastroenterology wards, pulmonary disease wards, and so on. The unit team plan provides superb opportunities for broadening the viewpoints of medical students and house staff alike. Teaching is improved, research is stimulated, and the purpose of the whole enterprise, to give the individual patient the best possible care, is constantly kept in view.

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