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Article
November 14, 1959

EFFECT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND LIPOPROTEIN CONCENTRATIONS

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

From the Research Division of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and the Frank E. Bunts Educational Institute.

JAMA. 1959;171(11):1500-1502. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73010290001014
Abstract

It has been suggested that cigarette smoking is in some way causally related to myocardial infarction and to coronary atherosclerosis. This is difficult to prove. Many investigators believe that the evidence is good for the association of hypercholesteremia and accelerated atherogenesis. If it could be shown that cigarette smoking is followed by a rise in serum cholesterol level, this could be interpreted as evidence in favor of a relationship of smoking and atherogenesis.

Methods of Study  The subjects of the present study were laboratory personnel. Fifteen were regular smokers; five were nonsmokers. A low-fat breakfast was eaten at about 7 a.m. The subjects refrained from smoking or taking fluids after 9 a.m. At 11:30 a.m. a control blood sample was taken, after which the subject smoked two nonfilter-tip cigarettes within a 10-minute period, inhaling deeply. Immediately, 10 minutes, and 30 minutes after the smoking was finished blood was collected. To

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