[Skip to Navigation]
Article
November 14, 1959

THE BALANCE BETWEEN RESEARCH AND TEACHING IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS

JAMA. 1959;171(11):1578-1579. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010290136020

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

All institutions of higher learning have in common the obligation to transmit and advance knowledge. The acceptance of dual responsibility of teaching and research in medical schools has posed in itself no serious problem, but the relationship between the two functions is not always as secure and comfortable as it should be. This has been particularly true in recent years, during which the ready availability of research funds has fostered great interest and growth in research activity.

Discussions about what constitutes a proper balance between these functions sometimes appears to indicate a belief that at worst research and teaching are antagonistic or at best that they are unhappy bedfellows. When these apparent beliefs are explored almost invariably they are denied, but still the controversy continues.

The attributes of critical intelligence, imaginative curiosity, controlled compassion, and a persistent will to find solutions to problems are equally basic and valuable to good

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×