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Article
December 5, 1959

INNER-EAR MECHANICS AND DEAFNESS: SPECIAL CONSIDERATION OF MENIERE'S SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich.

From the Physiological Acoustics Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology and Institute of Industrial Health, School of Medicine, University of Michigan.

JAMA. 1959;171(14):1927-1932. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010320017005
Abstract

Intensive study was made of the changes in the inner ear of a woman who died of other causes after suffering from Ménière's syndrome for four years. There was evidence that the ductus cochlearis had been overdistended by an excess of endolymph and that its rupture had been followed by partial repair. This would explain the fact that the symptoms had come in spells and that there had been a remission lasting two years. if the underlying process in Ménière's syndrome is overproduction of endolymph in the cochlea, then the logical remedy is either destruction of the cochlea or some other method of reducing the hydrops, rather than the destructive labyrinthotomy which had been contemplated. Destruction of the cochlea produces deafness but would relieve the vertigo, which is the more disabling of the two symptoms.

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