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Article
December 19, 1959

TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES AND EFFECTIVENESS OF GRISEOFULVIN IN DERMATOMYCOSIS

Author Affiliations

Austin, Texas

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Baylor University Post-graduate School of Medicine, and Consultant in Dermatology, Austin State School (Dr. McCuistion); Staff Pediatrician, Austin State School, and member of the Doctorate Committee, University of Texas (Dr. Lawlis); and Staff Physician, Austin State School (Dr. Gonzalez).

JAMA. 1959;171(16):2174-2180. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010340018004
Abstract

Griseofulvin was used to treat ringworm infection in 32 patients. In addition to observations on its effectiveness, close watch was kept for possible side-effects, and laboratory tests were applied to detect signs of damage to kidneys, testes, liver, brain, and hematopoietic tissues. Dosages usually were 0.5 or 1.0 Gm. of griseofulvin per day by mouth, and the treatment generally continued for 30 days. The organism most frequently found (12 cases) was Trichophyton tonsurans. Striking success was the rule, with the disappearance of fluorescent hairs and resumption of normal growth in previously deformed fingernails. The only indication of adverse effects was an increase in the proportion of mature lymphocytes found in the differential count. Under the conditions of this study griseofulvin appeared to be an effective and safe antibiotic for use in treating superficial fungus infections.

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