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Article
March 12, 1960

ARTIFICIAL EMBOLIZATION OF CEREBRAL ARTERIES: REPORT OF USE IN A CASE OF ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATION

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

From the Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Georgetown University Medical School, Washington, D. C.

JAMA. 1960;172(11):1153-1155. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.63020110001009
Abstract

It has been the theoretical and technical consideration of one of us (A. J. L.) that certain large arteriovenous malformations of the brain can be treated by artificial embolization. The major feeding arteries are greatly enlarged compared to the arteries to the surrounding brain.1 Because of the reduced peripheral resistance there is a far greater flow of blood to the malformation than to the surrounding brain.2 The main arterial feeders arborize into considerably smaller, "arteriole-like" vessels before entrance into the larger channels which constitute the bulk of the lesion.3 Therefore, an embolus of predetermined size and configuration, introduced even far proximal to the malformation, will always find its way to it. By its size the embolus will be excluded from passage into the smaller branches to the brain and will ultimately come to rest at a site proximal to the malformation where normal and abnormal vessels are

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