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Article
June 18, 1960

CONGESTIVE FAILURE DUE TO AURICULAR FIBRILLATION IN AN OTHERWISE NORMAL HEARTREPORT OF A CASE WITH TWENTY-FIVE YEAR FOLLOW-UP

JAMA. 1960;173(7):784-785. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.73020250001008
Abstract

The fact that auricular fibrillation may occur in a patient with an otherwise normal heart is generally accepted. However, that severe congestive failure may develop under such circumstances is not so well known. Since this type of heart disease is completely reversible, the importance of its recognition is apparent. Although a number of such cases have been recorded in the literature,1 it appears probable that many other cases remain unrecognized; thus, some patients are denied a chance for recovery.

A 25-year follow-up is presented of a case previously reported in 19371a and in 1947.1b The patient, a woman, was first seen in June, 1935, at 43 years of age. She was in severe congestive failure after having had uncontrolled auricular fibrillation for three months. Compensation was established by means of digitalis, diuretics, and diet, and normal sinus rhythm was restored with quinidine therapy (fig. 1). Rapid recovery

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