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Article
June 18, 1960

COMPLICATIONS AFTER RESECTION OF A RUPTURED ABDOMINAL ANEURYSM

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn, N. Y.

From the Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn and the State University of New York, College of Medicine at New York City.

JAMA. 1960;173(7):789-792. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.73020250006008b
Abstract

Resections of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are being carried out successfully with increasing frequency. Elective operation with graft replacement can be a well-controlled procedure, with a low mortality. This is in contrast to the greater difficulty and risk involved in emergency surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Wider experience has served to emphasize the various complications that can be encountered. The aorta proximal to the aneurysm often is dilated and has a wall altered by advanced arteriosclerotic changes. The danger of suture line leak is considerably greater in these cases than in resection for segmental occlusive disease. The expanding aneurysm may encase a ureter in its dense fibrous wall and lead to obstructive uropathy. This fact is important in preoperative evaluation and, if possible, intravenous urography should be performed. In spite of adequate precautions, however, ureteral injury may occur at operation. The following case serves to emphasize some

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