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Article
July 9, 1960

SLEEP PARALYSIS WITHOUT NARCOLEPSY OR CATAPLEXY: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations
New York City
From the Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York College of Medicine.
JAMA. 1960;173(10):1129-1130. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.73020280006014c
Abstract

Almost invariably sleep paralysis is reported in combination with narcolepsy and cataplexy. During the past 12 years I have encountered at least six patients with sleep paralysis alone. Narcolepsy or cataplexy were not concurrent, nor was a history of either elicited. Patients generally do not seek help for sleep paralysis in isolation, and as a matter of fact the symptoms apart from those of the narcoleptic triad are apparently not often correctly diagnosed. The dramatic aspects of narcolepsy are more readily identified. When sleep paralysis is mentioned in publications it is usually included in articles stressing narcolepsy.1 Only a few articles published during the past 20 years have given special attention to various aspects of sleep paralysis, such as psychodynamics and treatment.2 Since the diagnosis of sleep paralysis appears to be missed often, the affliction probably is more widespread than general physicians and specialists realize.

Sleep paralysis occurs

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