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Article
July 9, 1960

RECENT STUDIES OF THE ANATOMY OF THE LUNGS

JAMA. 1960;173(10):1141-1142. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020280081019
Abstract

The story of the bronchial tree begins with Aeby, who in 1880 published his "Der Bronchialbaum des Menschen, und der Thiere." The work dealt with 48 species belonging to some 14 mammalian families. Aeby concluded that "the ground plan of the bronchial tree is the same for all animals" and that "each lung possesses a dominant axial structure to be called the stem bronchus." He emphasized the monopodial character of the major branches and the monopodial character of the blood vessels. Aeby emphasized the relationship of bronchi to the main pulmonary arteries in distinguishing an eparterial from a hyparterial group. A major part of his monograph was devoted to the anatomy of the bronchial tree in man.

The English pathologist Ewart contributed, a few years earlier, a detailed study of the distribution of the bronchi and pulmonary vessels in a large number of lungs in man. "Moreover, a suspicion had

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