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Article
July 16, 1960

PERICARDITIS AFTER ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTIONRELAPSES OVER PERIOD OF TWENTY-EIGHT MONTHS

Author Affiliations

New York; Palos Heights, Ill.

From the Department of Medicine of the Maimonides Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y., and the College of Medicine, State University of New York, New York (Dr. Dressler); and the Saint Francis Hospital, Blue Island, Ill. (Dr. Leavitt).

JAMA. 1960;173(11):1225-1226. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.73020290006010b
Abstract

Pericarditis may accompany acute myocardial infarction as an insignificant feature or as a major complication which is often associated with pleurisy and not infrequently with pneumonia. The triad, resembling closely the postcardiotomy syndrome, has been referred to as post-myocardial-infarction syndrome.1 One of its characteristic features is a tendency to relapse. The following case is reported because a post-myocardial-infarction syndrome continued to recur over a period of 28 months.

Report of a Case  A 44-year-old man fell ill on Oct. 28, 1956, and had a sensation of severe pressure in the precordial area radiating to the left shoulder and arm. He was hospitalized on the same day, and an electrocardiogram showed features indicative of a recent anteroseptal-wall myocardial infarction. The patient felt better for four days, but on the fifth day he experienced gripping chest pain which was aggravated by supine position and deep inspiration. A pericardial friction rub was

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