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Article
November 20, 1967

Medical Missionary Service

Author Affiliations

Punjab, India; Adrian, Mich

JAMA. 1967;202(8):852. doi:10.1001/jama.1967.03130210226056
Abstract

THIS INQUIRY WAS SUBMITTED TO KENNETH M. SCOTT, MD, DIRECTOR, CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, PUNJAB, INDIA, AND ROBERT B. WHITE, MD, FORMERLY MISSIONARY PHYSICIAN, BELGIAN CONGO.

Whether you plan to become a short-term or a career medical missionary, you should have acquired professional knowledge and skills at least as good as the best available in the country to which you will go. The day has long passed when any medicine could be said to be better than no medicine at all. Prior experience in general practice or, better, full specialty training is a requisite for most service overseas. If you live in America, this means certification by an American specialty board, to be completed before going overseas or at least during the first furlough. This is important because of the increasingly prominent place that teaching has in most overseas medical institutions today.

Whether you serve in a developing country

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