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Article
February 9, 1976

Hemostasis, Antipyretics, and Mild Analgesics: Acetaminophen vs Aspirin

Author Affiliations

From the departments of pathology and medicine, Presbyterian Hospital, and the Institute of Health Research, Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco. Dr Heiden is a Hematology Research Fellow at the Pacific Medical Center.

JAMA. 1976;235(6):613-616. doi:10.1001/jama.1976.03260320021016
Abstract

The effects of acetaminophen and aspirin on the hemostatic process were compared. First, a single 975-mg or 1,950-mg dose of acetaminophen had no effect on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, or platelet factor 3 release in normal volunteers, in contrast with the significant increase in bleeding time and abnormalities in platelet aggregation caused by aspirin. Second, a seven-day course of either aspirin or acetaminophen, 1,950 mg daily, had no effect on specific coagulation factors, platelet factor 3 availability, or the fibrinolytic mechanism. Finally, a six-week course of acetaminophen, 1,950 mg daily, had no effect on the bleeding time in three hemophiliac patients and no effect on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, or platelet adhesion in four normal subjects. Acetaminophen is an antipyretic and mild analgesic that may be useful when influence on hemostasis is undesirable.

(JAMA 235:613-616, 1976)

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