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Article
February 7, 1977

Pediculosis Capitis

JAMA. 1977;237(6):530. doi:10.1001/jama.1977.03270330020005

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Abstract

To the Editor.—  The statement by Orkin et al (236:1136, 1976) regarding pediculosis capitis is in direct conflict with the clinical and epidemiologic picture of head lice as seen in the Dade County Department of Public Health during the past three years.The picture seen in Miami has been one of frequent repeated school-based outbreaks occurring primarily among elementary school children, with relatively fewer cases among the preschoolers. The statement, "As soon as children attend school, the frequency decreases rapidly in males but continues in females" is not substantiated in the article or in our clinical experience.Extensive epidemiologic studies conducted by local health department staff have demonstrated almost 100% infection rates among siblings of children found to have head lice. In our experience, the continuation of head lice among family members is generally caused by the failure to treat all family members at the time the initial case is

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